Saturday, May 3, 2014

What-What?! Week of May 4th

In just a few days, my baby will be two years old!  When did that happen?  I'm not ready for him to be so big.  He's a funny little guy, and a lot more far along developmentally than his older siblings at this age.  He talks so much, and so clearly.  His current interests include Thomas the Train (his favorite character is Percy), Chuck the Truck, and action figure "guys".  And Legos.  And dinosaurs.  Dragons, of course.  Barbies.  My Little Ponies.  Toothbrushes.  Pouring water on things (just not himself -- too close to taking a bath!).

But for all of his interests, I'm still his mama, and I get many snuggles. <3

Writing:  Amazon Royalties Payment!


Good news!  I have actually been paid for something that I wrote.  Mind you, it took 14 months to net that $107.99, but it still pleases me so.

News:  Industry Seeks Comment on Retirement of Coupon Barcodes via Progressive Grocer


In a step to further the move from standard UPC barcode coupons to databar coupons, the Joint Industry Coupon Committee is seeking comments from affected industries on the retirement of certain types of barcodes.  By June of 2015, all UPC-5 and GS1-99 barcodes will be retired, which is to say, most barcodes that still exist on coupons will disappear.

The move to databars for coupons has been in the works for about two years now, and it has advantages and disadvantages, both for the industry, and for customers.  It will lead to less coupon fraud, as well as accidental misredemption, but at the same time, which is great for manufacturers.  However, because the databar includes more information about what products are allowed and disallowed for the coupon, it will make it easier for coupons to be programmed improperly, not covering products that should be covered, leading to the dreaded "coupon not accepted" beep.  Granted, a certain amount of this happens already, but when a customer can look at the coding of the UPC and anticipate the beep, they can then be prepared to argue with the cashier if necessary (I've been there, done that).  For those that don't coupon often, you may be wondering how often coupons are misprogrammed?  While some manufacturers almost never have programming problems, some, like Nivea and Proctor & Gamble, have regular issues with it.  It's frustrating for customers and cashiers, and I expect for this to only increase with the databar codes.

(image via survivingthestores.com)

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